Sectarianism as a Symptom of Kleptocracy Syndrome

Sectarianism is being exploited by kleptocratic regimes, and many observers and international powers have become distracted by its symptoms rather than looking at kleptocracy as the cause. 

Sectarianism as a Symptom of Kleptocracy Syndrome Sectarianism as a Symptom of Kleptocracy Syndrome

Why Anti-Corruption Will Fail in the Czech Republic

Despite promising rhetoric, it is unlikely the Czech Republic will engage in any comprehensive anti-corruption reform.

Why Anti-Corruption Will Fail in the Czech Republic Why Anti-Corruption Will Fail in the Czech Republic

Misreading Sectarian Tensions: the Arab-Persian Struggle for Supremacy

From the Levant to Pakistan, Muslim-majority nations are involved in a proxy war that has pitted a Sunni-majority Saudi Arabia and a Shia-majority Iran against each other.

Misreading Sectarian Tensions: the Arab-Persian Struggle for Supremacy Misreading Sectarian Tensions: the Arab-Persian Struggle for Supremacy

Volume 38:1 of The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs Now Available

The editorial staff of The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs is pleased to bring you our latest issue, Winter Volume 38:1. The Winter 2014 volume features articles by military leaders, distinguished academics, and innovative policy practitioners in international affairs.

Volume 38:1 of The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs Now Available Volume 38:1 of The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs Now Available

2014 Global Risk Forum: An Introduction by Dean James Stavridis

Dean of The Fletcher School, James G. Stavridis, introduces the 2014 Global Risk Forum, identifying the top five risks to global stability in the year ahead.

2014 Global Risk Forum: An Introduction by Dean James Stavridis 2014 Global Risk Forum: An Introduction by Dean James Stavridis

Hard Data and Smart Power: the Future of U.S. Assistance to Afghanistan

April 14, 2014 by Mike Hartnett
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As the target date for U.S. military withdrawal in Afghanistan approaches, the United States risks a precipitous loss of influence in the region without a viable plan to transition from a military-heavy strategy towards one more focused on effective development assistance and smart power.

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Iran’s Women’s Movement: A Look Back and Ahead

April 9, 2014 by Leila Seradj
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Iran’s first champions of women’s rights understood that the denial of opportunities to females impeded economic progress. As this sentiment is being echoed today, Iran’s leaders must make good on its promises for greater gender equality.

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What the New NATO Secretary General Appointment Means for the Arctic

April 8, 2014 by Iveta Cherneva
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Even as NATO tries to fashion a response to the crisis on its eastern frontier in Ukraine, the appointment of Norway’s former prime minister Jens Stoltenberg as Secretary General should alert global attention to another region: the Arctic.

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Jordan’s Response to Refugee Education Crises: Lessons from the Syrian and Iraqi Cases

April 7, 2014 by Zeina Siam
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As the Syrian crisis continues, education must be a critical component of Jordan’s refugee response, drawing on lessons learned from previous experiences with long-term refugee flows.

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What if Modi Wins? The United States’ Balancing Act in India

March 31, 2014 by Brianna Dieter
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If Narendra Modi is voted into the highest office in India, the United States should work with him as India’s freely elected leader while taking visible steps to support and advance American values.

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Brazil’s Internet Constitution: The Struggle Continues

March 25, 2014 by Tim Ridout
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The contentious debate over Brazil’s “Internet constitution” could offer an important precedent for other countries confronting the tension between territorial legal systems and the borderless Internet.

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